History

Man’s inhumane treatment of man

                                                 

        Poem by Robert Burns:

 Many and sharp the num’rous ills 

Inwoven with our frame!

More pointed still we make ourselves
Regret, remorse, and shame!
And Man, whose heav’n-erected face
The smiles of love adorn, –
Man’s inhumanity to man
Makes countless thousands mourn

I attempted to center this poem, but due to a lack of computer skill was unsuccessful. 

May 1st was my birthday and as I told my children when they were very young, I remember being born and didn’t appreciate being hit on the butt by my doctor. I have been against violence ever since. I had no plans to live this long and am not yet sure it’s worth while. As society quickly passes by one feels the parade has passed you by. The two advantages of this age are the senior citizen discount and the respect you receive when walking with a cane. Because I’m still here I will continue with my nonconforming views of violence inherited from the doctor’s slap on my rear.

 From an early age, mentored by my father, I became a history buff. My father wasn’t a hugger and didn’t play baseball with me, but brought me books by authors who were realists and didn’t look at the world through rose colored glasses. The evening meal was always a learning experience; so here’s my opinion about the inhumane treatment of man towards man.

 The inhumanity that man shows towards others dates back to the beginning of time. We read about it in the Bible beginning with Cain murdering Abel. It has continued through history with the treatment of slaves and events like The Holocaust.

 There is in mankind a fatal flaw that fills to overflowing the annuals of history with accounts of barbarism, murder, rape, avarice, conquest, greed, sexual perversion, and depravity of every kind. It is tragically sad that the state of the inner man (soul) is no better today than it was thousands of years ago. Mankind is still ruled by his primordial base inclinations and deceits. The evidence is everywhere and in every corner of the globe.

In Evan Thomas’s last book ‘The War Lovers” John Mc Cain’s idol, Teddy Roosevelt, wanted a war, almost any war, any war would do. “He wrote to his friend Henry Cabot Lodge “Will you telegraph me at once if war becomes inevitable?” In 1897 he wrote to a friend in strict confidence, “I should welcome a war, for I think the country needs one.” I could elaborate extensively on Roosevelt’ hunger for war, but enough said.

In my previous blog I implied that we have a tendency to overrate our Presidents from both parties and will divulge my opinion on their unneeded annihilation of millions of fellow human beings.     

Let’s start with wars with which I’m familiar. Most politicians are more interested in preparation for reelection and hype a fight for national interests, such as freedom and liberty. The public becomes hysterical and brings out their flags. Americans making no sacrifices are enamored with war. Those sitting in their cozy homes with no family members fighting seem oblivious to the barbarism taking place in other families and those in other countries.

I lived through the wave of hysteria over Communism from the Mc McCarthy era up through Carter and Reagan. Besides Iran Contra and Vietnam and the thousands of Americans killed and maimed fighting windmills in these two countries and others in Central America. We were responsible for millions of civilians deaths referred to as collateral damage. Communism was the mythical fear use to justify our unsuccessful genocide in these counties. We even supported bin Laden when he was fighting Russia in Afghanistan.

Terrorism is defined as the calculated use of violence (or threat of violence) against civilians in order to attain goals that are political or religious or ideological in nature. This definition applies to all counties including our country. The 9/11 bombing has brought terrorism back as a hobgoblin, eliminating any common sense to other reactions besides genocide as a means of revenge.    

 In 1949 the first Atomic Bomb was dropped on Hiroshima leaving 100,000 dead and tens of thousands more slowly dying of radiation poisoning. Three days later another bomb was dropped on Nagasaki with perhaps fifty thousand killed. Could this be considered terrorism? No one can explain why either bomb was dropped on civilians especially the second bomb.

Another military response to ponder was Truman’s reducing North and South Korea to shambles in three years of bombing and shelling.  Perhaps two million were killed in this war and we still have troops stationed there.

I’m not going to go into many other unneeded inhumane treatments of other humans in Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan and others.

We should all be rejoicing as besides all those we have already killed in Libya we have been responsible for the death of Gaddafi’s 29 year old son a civilian and college student and three of his grandchildren. The definition of terrorism is killing civilians not involved in war. Our definition is that this definition only applies to other countries. Our most ardent concerns about death are a death of ones family member or close friend.

We are now dancing in the streets over another the death of bin Laden involved in the killing of less than three thousand Americans. The public is now clamoring to see pictures of his corpse.  

You may have noticed that I question the use of the word civilization. Same sex marriage and abortion appears to be the major concerns of most vocal Americans, but have been noticeably silent on the horrors of war.

Like  Obama I don’t remember the name of the doctor who slapped on my bottom to make me cry, but he sure had a lasting affect on my outlook and attitude towards human relations. Maybe we should restore this practice in births globally.

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

  

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2 responses to “History

  1. The death of BinLaden and other events have made me think about this subject lately. I don’t think the celebration of another is good and I am generally opposed to war. If I had my wish no war would ever be fought. But is Killing another human ever moral, justified or right thing to do?
    I am glad Hitler was killed and removed from power. There are many evil men that need to be stopped from the destruction they bring upon others but defining who, how and where and making the decisions is difficult. Sometimes the decisions makers are wrong, misinformed or corrupt. I find when I sit on the sidelines of an operation it is easy to criticize others actions and motives but when I am put in the position to lead I realize the difficulty of decisions.
    When is it Terrorism, Revenge, Aggression? When is it defense? At what point does defending your home or nation become retaliation, vendetta or revenge?
    To say all war is evil and unjust is as erroneous as to say all war is necessary is good.

    Terrorism:
    There is no universally agreed, legally binding, criminal law definition of terrorism.[1][2] Common definitions of terrorism refer only to those violent acts which are intended to create fear (terror), are perpetrated for a religious, political or ideological goal, deliberately target or disregard the safety of non-combatants (civilians), and are committed by non-government agencies.
    Revenge
    Shakespeare’s Hamlet tells a history in which a man avenged the murder of his father by killing his uncle[1] (Artist: Gustave Moreau)
    Revenge is a harmful action against a person or group in response to a grievance, be it real or perceived. It is also called vengeance or “payback” (in U.S. English).
    Although revenge resembles some conceptions of justice, vengeance is usually depicted as more injurious and punitive as opposed to being harmonious and restorative. Whereas justice implies actions undertaken and supported by a legitimate judicial system grounded upon a foundation of ethics and morals of the authorities, revenge implies actions undertaken by an individual or narrowly defined group outside the boundaries of judicial or ethical conduct whose goal is to force a wrongdoer to suffer the same or greater pain than that which was originally inflicted to a party.

    Defend:
    –verb (used with object)
    1.to ward off attack from; guard against assault or injury (usually followed by from or against ): The sentry defended the gate against sudden attack.
    2.to maintain by argument, evidence, etc.; uphold: She defended her claim successfully.
    3.to contest (a legal charge, claim, etc.).

  2. Vicki Sue McKinnis

    I also believe in non-violence as the desirable approach, however I wonder if anything aside from war would have stopped the Holocaust, or if we should have intervened in Rwanda. After 9/11, when the country was crying for revenge, I wished for another approach. Thinking that my very son might have to die, I hoped that we would instead completely withdraw from the Middle East, boycotted oil imports and prayerfully prepare ourselves to defend our own shores. Unfortunately, our desire to defend ourselves was mingled with the financial interests of many of our leaders, and so a non-violent approach wasn’t even considered.
    What is the answer in the question of how to defend ourselves from the violent and corrupt motives of others? I don’t think we can sit by and allow the Hitler’s of the world to march the innocent off to death camps, and on the other hand to go to war for imperialist motives has to be the worst of all deeds.
    We do live in a world of so much violence. How I long for a time of peace!

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